Barchart allows you to view options by Expiration Date ( select the termination month/year using the drop-down menu at the top of the page ). weekly exhalation dates are labeled with a ( tungsten ) in the termination date list. Options data is delayed a minimum of 15 minutes, and is updated at least once every 15-minutes through-out the day. Select an options passing date from the drop-down number at the circus tent of the table, and select “ Near-the-Money ” or “ Show All ‘ to view all options.

note : option quotes with an star * after the strickle price are “ qualify options ”, typically created after spin-offs or mergers. You can besides view options in a Stacked or Side-by-Side horizon. The View setting determines how Puts and Calls are listed on the page. For both views, “ Near-the-Money ” Calls and Puts are highlighted : Near-the-Money – Puts : assume Price is greater than the last Price
Near-the-Money – Calls : fall Price is less than the last price Logged in Barchart Members can set a predilection for how this foliate displays.

  1. Select your desired number of strikes
    • 5 Strikes +/-
    • Near-the-Money (10 Strikes +/-)
    • 20 Strikes +/-
    • 50 Strikes +/-
    • All Strikes
  2. Select the page layout (Stacked, Stacked OHLC, Side-by-Side, Side-by-Side HLC)
  3. Choose whether or not to show the Volume Graph. The Volume Graph highlights the comparative proportion of volume and open interest for selected strikes. It helps you easily see activity that may signal new positions or a potential move in the underlying asset.
  4. Sort the Strike column in ascending or descending order
  5. Finally, click the “Make this my default view” link top right of the page to save your preference for the next time you visit the page.

For the selected Options Expiration date, the information listed at the top of the page includes :

  • Options Expiration: The last day on which an option may be exercised, or the date when an option contract ends. Also includes the number of days till options expiration (this number includes weekends and holidays).
  • Implied Volatility: The average implied volatility (IV) of the options contract. IV is a forward looking prediction of the likelihood of price change of the underlying asset, with a higher IV signifying that the market expects significant price movement, and a lower IV signifying the market expects the underlying asset price to remain within the current trading range.
  • Historic Volatility: The 30-day historic volatility for the underlying asset. Historic volatility is the standard deviation of the “price returns” over a given number of sessions, multiplied by a factor (260 days) to produce an annualized volatility level. 

Stacked scene A Stacked scene lists Puts and Calls one on top of the other, sorted by Strike Price.

  • Strike: The price at which the contract can be exercised. Strike prices are fixed in the contract. For call options, the strike price is where the shares can be bought (up to the expiration date), while for put options the strike price is the price at which shares can be sold. The difference between the underlying contract’s current market price and the option’s strike price represents the amount of profit per share gained upon the exercise or the sale of the option. This is true for options that are in the money; the maximum amount that can be lost is the premium paid. 
  • Moneyness – the percent from the last price: (strike price – last / last). Moneyness refers to the relative position of the underlying asset’s last price to the strike price. When a call option’s Moneyness is negative, the underlying last price is less than the strike price; when positive, the underlying last price is greater than the strike price. When a put option’s Moneyness is negative, the underlying last price is greater than the strike price; when positive, the underlying last price is less than the strike price.
  • Bid: The bid price for the option.
  • Midpoint: The midpoint between the bid and ask.
  • Ask: The ask price for the option.
  • Last: The last traded price for the options contract.
  • Change: The difference between the current price and the previous day’s settlement price.
  • %Change: The difference between the current price and the previous day’s settlement price, expressed as a percent.
  • Volume: The total number of option contracts bought and sold for the day, for that particular strike price.
  • Open Interest: Open Interest is the total number of open option contracts that have been traded but not yet liquidated via offsetting trades for that date.
  • Vol/OI – for the Strike Price: today’s volume / today’s open interest. A higher ratio indicates unusual activity for the option.
  • Implied Volatility – Implied Volatility (IV) is the estimated volatility of the underlying stock over the period of the option. IV can help traders determine if options are fairly valued, undervalued, or overvalued. It can therefore help traders make decisions about option pricing, and whether it is a good time to buy or sell options. Implied volatility is determined mathematically by using current option prices in a formula that also includes Standard Volatility (which is based on historical data). The resulting number helps traders determine whether the premium of an option is “fair” or not. It is also a measure of investors’ predictions about future volatility of the underlying stock.

Side-by-Side scene A Side-by-Side View lists Calls on the impart and Puts on the correctly.

  • Last:  The last traded price for the options contract.
  • %Change: The difference between the current price and the previous day’s settlement price, expressed as a percent.
  • Bid: The bid price for the option.
  • Ask: The ask price for the option.
  • Volume: The total number of option contracts bought and sold for the day, for that particular strike price.
  • Open Interest: Open Interest is the total number of open option contracts that have been traded but not yet liquidated via offsetting trades for that date.
  • Strike: The price at which the contract can be exercised. Strike prices are fixed in the contract. For call options, the strike price is where the shares can be bought (up to the expiration date), while for put options the strike price is the price at which shares can be sold. The difference between the underlying contract’s current market price and the option’s strike price represents the amount of profit per share gained upon the exercise or the sale of the option. This is true for options that are in the money; the maximum amount that can be lost is the premium paid. 

volume Graph

When checked, the volume Graph highlights the relative symmetry of volume and open sake for selected strikes. It helps you easily see bodily process that may signal new positions or a potential move in the underlying asset. Totals The totals listed at the bottom of the page are calculated from all calls and puts, and not barely Near-the-Money options. volume totals reflect options traded during the stream seance.

  • Put Volume Total:  The total volume of all put option premiums.
  • Call Volume Total:  The total volume of all call option premiums.
  • Put/Call Volume Ratio: Put Volume Total / Call Volume Total.
  • Put Open Interest Total:  The total open interest of all put options.
  • Call Open Interest Total:  The total open interest of all call options.
  • Put/Call Open Interest Ratio: Put Open Interest Total / Call Open Interest Total.

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