The first few episodes start off as prequels for the main seven characters – three ‘Meisters/Technicians’ and their ‘Weapons’. These episodes are ones that I found to be somewhat disjointed, and to be honest I probably would have given up on the anime after 4 episodes or so if it wasn’t for aforementioned pally. Swiftly afterwards, once the main characters start to interact together, I was hooked. And shortly after that when the frankly ingenious support characters were introduced and fleshed out, I was manic about it to the point where I was screaming in outrage at the screen if any other character DARED to so much as harm a hair on their heads.

Plot – [7/10] I wouldn’t describe the plot as being either typical or particularly inventive. I will say, however, that it does dangle a standard premise in front of you for a good few episodes (in order for a Technician to turn their Weapon into the ultimate Death Scythe, they must collect 99 evil souls and then one Witch’s soul; cue epic quest) and then almost entirely removes it for something much better – a pleasant surprise that, as I understand it, doesn’t quite happen in the manga. While some elements of the plot remain unclear and somewhat incomplete by the end of the series, I ultimately felt that it didn’t detract too much from my enjoyment. Bar the very last scenes, unfortunately, in which I was left starving for a bit more of a tie-up, or better yet, a follow-up montage in the ending credits. Still, I suppose that’s what the manga’s for.

Characters – [9/10] The meat of Soul Eater, with some big-name voice actors who really give the characters life. Firstly, we have Miyano Mamoru-san (Yagami Light of Death Note, Kiba of Wolf’s Rain) as the symmetry-obssessed Death the Kid (an awkward-sounding name, I have to say, that belies a truly slick character); the ever-prolific and utterly fabulous Koyasu Takehito-san (Sakarazuka Seishirou of Tokyo Babylon, Zechs Merquise/Milliardo Peacecraft of Gundam Wing) as the Weapon Excalibur, who will surprise you in several different ways with his presence throughout the series; and Kobayashi Yumiko-san (Sarah McDougal of Love Hina, Dan Taichi of Prince of Tennis) as the headstrong Black*Star, to whom a nod must go for the most subtle yet engaging main-character development; to name a few. On top of these, Soul Eater showcases a surprising amount of young, new talent – notably, the voices of Soul (the title character) and Maka Albarn, the female lead who I unfortunately found to be incredibly irritating.

Let me make my point hard on this. Maka is hard-working and academically very smart, with a down-to-earth attitude that helps her to deal with her absent mother and womanizing father, who recently divorced prior to the start of the series. But (and oh, it’s a big But) it doesn’t last. Rather than character growth, we seem to have a case of the exact opposite as the series progresses. Maka repeatedly ends up making absolutely ridiculous decisions that can in no way be logically justified. As much as I don’t like to use Naruto as a comparison, I think I have to. Maka’s choices aren’t a Naruto-style situation wherein Naruto makes sometimes-stupid decisions because of his raw emotions, because that’s Naruto’s character and way of life; plus, Naruto has (for the most part) the strength to back up his convictions. Maka, on the other hand, does not. Not only that, but she apparently doesn’t learn from her monumental mistakes. And /then/ she’ll bitch to the series’ headstrong character Black*Star about how he acts before he thinks. Though, come to think of it, at least Maka isn’t exactly a hypocrite on that matter because it’s shown that she does in fact think about her actions before she carries them out, comes to the conclusion that it’s stupid… and then does the wrong thing /anyway/. If it wasn’t for almost every other character providing sustained interest and sheer compelling brilliance whenever Maka’s off-screen, I think Soul Eater would fall far short of greatness.

Art – [9/10] And of course, there can be no characters without the visual art. While the quality of the animation itself is fairly standard shounen-style fare, the rating for this section gets bumped up enormously for originality. The designs of virtually everything – from the fantastically surreal moon and sun to the laboratory of the anime’s resident Mad Scientist (who would have an entire paragraph in the above section if it wouldn‘t turn into an essay on why he’s such a /darn good character/ on both an emotional and a story-telling level) to the eyes of the later villains – positively shines with mouth-watering creativity. I could wax lyrical about the brain-melting inventiveness of the character designs all day. It’s honestly worth watching for the artistic genius alone.

Music – [8/10] With the exception of the very first ending theme (which was painful, if I’m honest), I thoroughly appreciated each different ending and opening. They were well-chosen and fitted the style and feel of the anime well. The music used throughout the episodes themselves suited the atmosphere wonderfully – the fighting music was driving, the sad-scenes music was sorrowful and the cheery music gave the anime a smile. While it wasn’t as memorable as, say, the music to Gundam Wing or Gintama, it did its job in style. Also in this section, I’d like to add that the song sung by the Weapon Excalibur made me almost die of Sheer Heart-Rending Joy.

Overall – [9/10] Easy to watch and a great mix of creepy, surreal and fun. Objectively, I’d give this a high 8, and then I’m going to take the liberty of bumping it up to a 9 for the downright enjoyment I experienced with this show. I thoroughly recommend this to anyone who enjoys Full Metal Alchemist or Gintama – or, for that matter, any shounen manga/anime – as well as anyone who enjoyed the quirks of such series as Ouran High School Host Club.

busy to watch any. Let me tell you, this does not make for hard watching.The inaugural few episodes start off as prequels for the main seven characters – three ‘Meisters/Technicians ‘ and their ‘Weapons ‘. These episodes are ones that I found to be slightly disjoin, and to be honest I probably would have given up on the anime after 4 episodes or then if it was n’t for aforementioned chummy. swiftly afterwards, once the main characters start to interact in concert, I was hooked. And curtly after that when the honestly clever support characters were introduced and fleshed out, I was frenzied about it to the point where I was screaming in rape at the screen if any other quality DARED to so much as harm a hair on their heads.Plot – [ 7/10 ] I would n’t describe the plot as being either distinctive or peculiarly imaginative. I will say, however, that it does dangle a criterion precede in movement of you for a estimable few episodes ( in order for a technician to turn their Weapon into the ultimate Death Scythe, they must collect 99 evil souls and then one Witch ‘s soul ; prompt epic quest ) and then about wholly removes it for something much better – a pleasant surprise that, as I understand it, does n’t quite happen in the manga. While some elements of the plot remain indecipherable and slightly incomplete by the end of the series, I ultimately felt that it did n’t detract excessively much from my enjoyment. Bar the very last scenes, unfortunately, in which I was left starving for a bite more of a affiliation, or better so far, a follow-up collage in the ending credits. still, I suppose that ‘s what the manga ‘s for.Characters – [ 9/10 ] The meat of Soul Eater, with some big-name voice actors who actually give the characters life. first, we have Miyano Mamoru-san ( Yagami Light of Death Note, Kiba of Wolf ‘s Rain ) as the symmetry-obssessed Death the Kid ( an awkward-sounding name, I have to say, that belies a rightfully glib character ) ; the ever-prolific and absolutely fabulous Koyasu Takehito-san ( Sakarazuka Seishirou of Tokyo Babylon, Zechs Merquise/Milliardo Peacecraft of Gundam Wing ) as the Weapon Excalibur, who will surprise you in respective different ways with his presence throughout the series ; and Kobayashi Yumiko-san ( Sarah McDougal of Love Hina, Dan Taichi of Prince of Tennis ) as the froward Black*Star, to whom a nod must go for the most insidious even engaging main-character growth ; to name a few. On top of these, Soul Eater showcases a surprise sum of young, newly endowment – notably, the voices of Soul ( the title character ) and Maka Albarn, the female moderate who I unfortunately found to be fabulously irritating.Let me make my target hard on this. Maka is hard-working and academically very smart, with a down-to-earth attitude that helps her to deal with her absent mother and womanizing father, who recently divorced prior to the begin of the serial. But ( and oh, it ‘s a big But ) it does n’t last. quite than character growth, we seem to have a font of the demand inverse as the series progresses. Maka repeatedly ends up making absolutely pathetic decisions that can in no way be logically justify. deoxyadenosine monophosphate much as I do n’t like to use Naruto as a comparison, I think I have to. Maka ‘s choices are n’t a Naruto-style site wherein Naruto makes sometimes-stupid decisions because of his raw emotions, because that ‘s Naruto ‘s character and direction of life ; plus, Naruto has ( for the most share ) the forte to back up his convictions. Maka, on the early bridge player, does not. not only that, but she obviously does n’t learn from her massive mistakes. And /then/ she ‘ll bitch to the series ‘ froward character Black*Star about how he acts before he thinks. Though, come to think of it, at least Maka is n’t precisely a hypocrite on that matter because it ‘s shown that she does in fact think about her actions before she carries them out, comes to the conclusion that it ‘s stupid … and then does the incorrectly thing /anyway/. If it was n’t for about every early character providing sustained interest and sheer compelling glare whenever Maka ‘s off-screen, I think Soul Eater would fall far brusque of greatness.Art – [ 9/10 ] And of course, there can be no characters without the ocular art. While the quality of the animation itself is fairly standard shounen-style fare, the rate for this section gets bumped up enormously for originality. The designs of about everything – from the fabulously phantasmagoric moon and sun to the lab of the anime ‘s nonmigratory Mad Scientist ( who would have an entire paragraph in the above section if it wouldn ‘ thymine change by reversal into an essay on why he ’ s such a /darn good character/ on both an emotional and a story-telling level ) to the eyes of the subsequently villains – positively shines with mouth-watering creativity. I could wax lyrical about the brain-melting inventiveness of the character designs all day. It ‘s honestly worth watching for the artistic genius alone.Music – [ 8/10 ] With the exception of the very beginning ending theme ( which was irritating, if I ‘m honest ), I thoroughly appreciated each different ending and opening. They were happy and fitted the style and feel of the zanzibar copal well. The music used throughout the episodes themselves suited the standard atmosphere wonderfully – the fighting music was driving, the sad-scenes music was sorrowful and the cheery music gave the zanzibar copal a smile. While it was n’t deoxyadenosine monophosphate memorable as, say, the music to Gundam Wing or Gintama, it did its job in style. besides in this section, I ‘d like to add that the song spill the beans by the Weapon Excalibur made me about die of Sheer Heart-Rending Joy.Overall – [ 9/10 ] Easy to watch and a great mix of creepy, phantasmagoric and fun. objectively, I ‘d give this a high 8, and then I ‘m going to take the shore leave of bumping it up to a 9 for the absolute enjoyment I experienced with this show. I thoroughly recommend this to anyone who enjoys Full Metal Alchemist or Gintama – or, for that matter, any shounen manga/anime – deoxyadenosine monophosphate well as anyone who enjoyed the quirks of such series as Ouran High School Host Club.

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